The Vivian Maier "Discovery" Is More Complicated Than We Thought

The complicated saga of Vivian Maier continues. This story goes to show, history isn’t even written by those who record it, but by those who own the rights to those records.

Filter Photo Interview: Michael Ensdorf

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Gallery view, courtesy of The Gage Gallery

Michael Ensdorf is a reviewer for the 2014 Filter Photo Festival. He is a Professor of Photography and Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences at Roosevelt University in Chicago, where he teaches courses in chemical and digital photography. He is also the founding Director and Curator of Exhibitions for the Gage Gallery at Roosevelt University.

Interview by W. Tanner Young.

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From the series Carry Me Ohio by Matt Eich

W. Tanner Young: When did you found the Gage Gallery, what was your inspiration for doing so, and how did it come to fruition at Roosevelt University?

Michael Ensdorf: The Gage Gallery at Roosevelt University was founded in September, 2001. Our first opening was on September 13th, 2001. Needless to say, it was a somber affair. Everyone was reeling from the attacks. The gallery came about because I was able to convince the university that we needed one! I was on the space planning committee for the Gage building, so I was able to lobby for a gallery, and make it happen.

 

WTY: Tell me a little bit about your background, education and initial interest in the art of photography?

ME: I’ve always been interested in photography. I started photographing when I was nine years old and have never stopped! I received my undergraduate degree in photography from Columbia College, and my MFA from the University of Illinois at Chicago. I exhibited my own work for over twenty years, and began curating in earnest about ten years ago.

 

WTY: As Founder and Director of the Gage Gallery at Roosevelt University, you’ve brought in well known and respected names from around the country, and as your mission states, their work heavily deals with social issues and justice. Is there a particular reason Gage Gallery focuses on this genre of photography? Is this a subject that you photograph personally, as well?

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Filter Photo Interview: David Carol

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Telefon Booth and Motorcycle, 1997, David J. Carol

David J. Carol is a reviewer for the 2014 Filter Photo Festival. He attended the School of Visual Arts and The New School for Social Research where he studied under Lisette Model. He was the first assignment photographer for The Image Bank photo agency (now part of Getty Images) at the age of 26. He currently works daily in the real world of commercial photography as the Director of Photography at CBS Outdoor. Yet he also loves giving other photographers a platform to share and discuss their work with the photographic community. He is able to do this as a contributing writer for Rangefinder Magazine with his monthly column Photo Finish and with his weekly articles for PDN’s Emerging Photographer Magazine. He also serves on the Board of Advisers for the Center for Alternative Photography.

Interview by W. Tanner Young

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Charth Vader, Ashly Stohl. June 2014 Photo Finish Feature

W. Tanner Young: Let’s start with a little bit about your background, education and initial interest in the art of photography.

David Carol: I started taking pictures at 18 because my friend, Frank Russo, got a camera for his 21st birthday. I wanted one too, it looked so cool and seemed very precise. I ended up taking pictures of pretty much everything and thought this could be a great excuse to travel the world. I ended up applying to SVA in NYC. During my interview, I was asked what type of photography I wanted to do. I was such a photographic neophyte, I didn’t even know what that meant so I said “Fashion.” The interviewer said, “thats great, we don’t get many people interested in fashion here.” I Guess thats why they took me. Anyway, I dropped out after two years and went to Paris.





WTY: As a juror, writer, and photographer yourself, you hold a very unique position in the photo world. Do you find that these positions all inform each other, and has this had an effect on the way you view other’s work?

DC: I look at all photography the same way whether its editorial, journalism, personal work, etc. Is this an interesting, organized and compelling picture? If it’s not, I figure out what the photographer missed or failed to convey in the image. Its really not very complicated. In my opinion, too many people in the “photo industry” don’t know enough about photography. They write about it and they critique it, but they don’t have a clue how to make a good photograph.


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All images by Lois Bielefeld
Image #1 from The BedroomImage #2 from Weeknight DinnersImage #3 from Lunch PortraitsImage #4 from Conceal CarryImage #5 from Androgyny 

Review by W. Tanner Young as part of the featured Filter Member Photo Set Series

All these images are from different series by Lois Bielefeld, but they all revolve around one thing – personality. Except for Conceal Carry, all of Bielefeld’s projects focus on everyday rituals, and perceptions of safety and gender so commonplace we don’t even realize the idiosyncrasies that make them unique to us. The way we construct our private bedrooms, the way in which we eat or what we eat are things that we all do intuitively, but its the unheeded second-nature of those actions that reflects our opinions and tastes, and in turn offer a glimpse into our personality. Even a cookie-cutter room straight out of IKEA or a salad for lunch everyday speaks volumes about the desires and principles of the owner. Through portraits, video and audio, Bielefeld’s voyeuristic interests are not merely concerned with the physical world – these interests pry into the mind of her subjects.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Canon EOS 5D Mark II
  • 400
  • f/5.6
  • 1/60th
  • 25mm
All images by Lois Bielefeld
Image #1 from The BedroomImage #2 from Weeknight DinnersImage #3 from Lunch PortraitsImage #4 from Conceal CarryImage #5 from Androgyny 

Review by W. Tanner Young as part of the featured Filter Member Photo Set Series

All these images are from different series by Lois Bielefeld, but they all revolve around one thing – personality. Except for Conceal Carry, all of Bielefeld’s projects focus on everyday rituals, and perceptions of safety and gender so commonplace we don’t even realize the idiosyncrasies that make them unique to us. The way we construct our private bedrooms, the way in which we eat or what we eat are things that we all do intuitively, but its the unheeded second-nature of those actions that reflects our opinions and tastes, and in turn offer a glimpse into our personality. Even a cookie-cutter room straight out of IKEA or a salad for lunch everyday speaks volumes about the desires and principles of the owner. Through portraits, video and audio, Bielefeld’s voyeuristic interests are not merely concerned with the physical world – these interests pry into the mind of her subjects.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Canon EOS 5D Mark III
  • 640
  • f/7.1
  • 1/60th
  • 37mm
All images by Lois Bielefeld
Image #1 from The BedroomImage #2 from Weeknight DinnersImage #3 from Lunch PortraitsImage #4 from Conceal CarryImage #5 from Androgyny 

Review by W. Tanner Young as part of the featured Filter Member Photo Set Series

All these images are from different series by Lois Bielefeld, but they all revolve around one thing – personality. Except for Conceal Carry, all of Bielefeld’s projects focus on everyday rituals, and perceptions of safety and gender so commonplace we don’t even realize the idiosyncrasies that make them unique to us. The way we construct our private bedrooms, the way in which we eat or what we eat are things that we all do intuitively, but its the unheeded second-nature of those actions that reflects our opinions and tastes, and in turn offer a glimpse into our personality. Even a cookie-cutter room straight out of IKEA or a salad for lunch everyday speaks volumes about the desires and principles of the owner. Through portraits, video and audio, Bielefeld’s voyeuristic interests are not merely concerned with the physical world – these interests pry into the mind of her subjects.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III
  • 200
  • f/7.1
  • 1/200th
  • 90mm
All images by Lois Bielefeld
Image #1 from The BedroomImage #2 from Weeknight DinnersImage #3 from Lunch PortraitsImage #4 from Conceal CarryImage #5 from Androgyny 

Review by W. Tanner Young as part of the featured Filter Member Photo Set Series

All these images are from different series by Lois Bielefeld, but they all revolve around one thing – personality. Except for Conceal Carry, all of Bielefeld’s projects focus on everyday rituals, and perceptions of safety and gender so commonplace we don’t even realize the idiosyncrasies that make them unique to us. The way we construct our private bedrooms, the way in which we eat or what we eat are things that we all do intuitively, but its the unheeded second-nature of those actions that reflects our opinions and tastes, and in turn offer a glimpse into our personality. Even a cookie-cutter room straight out of IKEA or a salad for lunch everyday speaks volumes about the desires and principles of the owner. Through portraits, video and audio, Bielefeld’s voyeuristic interests are not merely concerned with the physical world – these interests pry into the mind of her subjects.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Canon EOS 5D Mark II
  • 400
  • f/6.3
  • 1/60th
  • 55mm
All images by Lois Bielefeld
Image #1 from The BedroomImage #2 from Weeknight DinnersImage #3 from Lunch PortraitsImage #4 from Conceal CarryImage #5 from Androgyny 

Review by W. Tanner Young as part of the featured Filter Member Photo Set Series

All these images are from different series by Lois Bielefeld, but they all revolve around one thing – personality. Except for Conceal Carry, all of Bielefeld’s projects focus on everyday rituals, and perceptions of safety and gender so commonplace we don’t even realize the idiosyncrasies that make them unique to us. The way we construct our private bedrooms, the way in which we eat or what we eat are things that we all do intuitively, but its the unheeded second-nature of those actions that reflects our opinions and tastes, and in turn offer a glimpse into our personality. Even a cookie-cutter room straight out of IKEA or a salad for lunch everyday speaks volumes about the desires and principles of the owner. Through portraits, video and audio, Bielefeld’s voyeuristic interests are not merely concerned with the physical world – these interests pry into the mind of her subjects.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Canon EOS 5D Mark III
  • 500
  • f/4.5
  • 1/50th
  • 66mm

All images by Lois Bielefeld

Image #1 from The Bedroom
Image #2 from Weeknight Dinners
Image #3 from Lunch Portraits
Image #4 from Conceal Carry
Image #5 from Androgyny 

Review by W. Tanner Young as part of the featured Filter Member Photo Set Series

All these images are from different series by Lois Bielefeld, but they all revolve around one thing – personality. Except for Conceal Carry, all of Bielefeld’s projects focus on everyday rituals, and perceptions of safety and gender so commonplace we don’t even realize the idiosyncrasies that make them unique to us. The way we construct our private bedrooms, the way in which we eat or what we eat are things that we all do intuitively, but its the unheeded second-nature of those actions that reflects our opinions and tastes, and in turn offer a glimpse into our personality. Even a cookie-cutter room straight out of IKEA or a salad for lunch everyday speaks volumes about the desires and principles of the owner. Through portraits, video and audio, Bielefeld’s voyeuristic interests are not merely concerned with the physical world – these interests pry into the mind of her subjects.

Forms and Functions of Photobooks (Part 1)

have we mentioned the BIG NEWS with our 1st juried photo book show? Not only has the submission deadline been extended to August 1, but the show itself will now be traveling to Madison after the 2014 Filter Photo Festival, to run concurrently with the SPE Midwest Conference! special thanks to the Wisconsin Book Festival, The Bubbler at The Madison Public Library and Flak Photo for coming together to make this possible.

To get you in the photo book mindset, here’s the first part of a series of articles exploring photo books on Jorg Colberg’s Conscientious Magazine.

And don’t forget about our special Smyth Sewn Photo Book Workshop during the 2014 Filter Photo Festival, taught by April Wilkins!

Open Call for Photo Books: Juried by Gregory Harris
2014 Filter Photo Festival
Submission Deadline: August 1st

Filter Photo Interview: Gordon Stettinius

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©Gordon Stettinius

In 2010, Gordon Stettinius founded Candela Books, a publishing company, and, to date, they have produced three fine art photography monographs with more in the works.  In 2011, Stettinius founded a fine art photography gallery dedicated to featuring the work of nationally respected photographers.Candela Books + Gallery now inhabits a renovated 3,800 square foot building in the downtown arts district of Richmond, Virginia and is one of the leading advocates for fine art photography in the mid-Atlantic region. As a photographer, Stettinius has been exhibited nationally and internationally over the last twenty years and his work can be found in numerous private and public collections.  His work is represented by Robin Rice Gallery in New York and Page Bond Gallery in Richmond, Virginia. Stettinius is also an emeritus member of 1708 Gallery and an adjunct professor at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Interview by Lauren Goldstein

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©Gita Lenz

Lauren Goldstein: It was the work of Gita Lenz that inspired you to start Candela Books, and over the past few years photo books have become a popular method of display as well as a way for photographers to self-promote their work. Why do you think photo books are having a moment in the spotlight? Do you have any favorite photo books?

Gordon Stettinius: I am excited about the growing popularity of the artist book, and I am enjoying the ways that artists are empowering themselves outside of the traditional publishing mainstream. My main reason for venturing into the traditionally offset printed book was that I really wanted Gita’s book to have the feel of the books of her contemporaries - she was working from the 1940s into the 1960s.

The first photography book I ever bought was Ralph Eugene Meatyard, the first Aperture Monograph, with an implausible pink cover. And that book has always remained a favorite. This book helped me to realize that the photographer needn’t be passive; they could intervene, could accept reality and then build on it, and my mind was sort of blown. I still have a fondness for people who are astute observers of the world around them, but I admire also those who fashion the world as they see fit, where reality is more relative and mutable.

 

LG: You are the juror for Filter’s fifth annual juried exhibition, This May Have Happened, which calls for images that will compel viewers to ask questions and make assumptions about the narrative within still photographs. What compelled you to theme the exhibition around the power of suggestion?

GS: Visual narrative appeals to me. I like where the mind goes with just a hint of information. The photograph as document is often less interesting to me unless that document leaves me room to interpret, expand, and synthesize. Editorial illustration can be a very powerful and persuasive thing with a 1:1 ratio where image equals understanding. But then there are those offbeat moments when you are called to question an image’s motivation, the events leading up to or away from that ‘supreme instant’, when there is more than one interpretation.

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Filter Photo Interview: Gregory Harris

imageA view of the DePaul Art Museum

Gregory Harris is a reviewer for the 2014 Filter Photo Festival as well as the juror for Filter Photo’s 1st Photo Book Show. He is the assistant curator at the DePaul Art Museum. Previously he served as a guest curator and research assistant in the photography department at the Art Institute of Chicago, where he organized the exhibitions In the Vernacular (2010) and Of National Interest (2008). Harris earned a BFA in photography from Columbia College Chicago, and an MA in art history from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Interview by W. Tanner Young

 

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Adler, The Sochi Region, Russia, 2011, Rob Hornstra

W. Tanner Young: Easy one first, when did you start working at the DePaul Art Museum, and what are some major contributions you’ve made there?

 Gregory Harris: I’ve been at DePaul since June of 2010; I actually started on the day they broke ground for the new building. I’ve curated a handful of exhibitions, primarily all around photography. I did a show about Malick Sidibé, who was a Malian portrait photographer, and I did one with Paul D’Amato who is a Chicago-based photographer. The most recent project I did was The Sochi Project, An Atlas of War & Tourism in the Caucasus, by Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen.

WTY: Yeah, that was a great show! I remember we [Filter Photo] collaborated with DPAM for a workshop with Hornstra & van Bruggen. We really loved the show and that workshop, as well as all the public programming that went along with it (especially the karaoke, as you may recall!). The entire experience seemed to be one big bang to start off the new year. Could you tell me a little about the process of getting Hornstra and van Bruggen, and the inspiration behind all the programming?

GH: The genesis of the project actually came out of my somewhat unhealthy obsession with photo books! Rob is a prolific photo book maker and that’s how I first heard about him several years ago, when his book 101 Billionaires came out. I heard that he was starting this new project about Sochi, 5 years before the Olympics in Russia, and it sounded like an interesting thing to follow.

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hyperallergic:

(via Conceptual Artist On Kawara Dead at 81)
The David Zwirner gallery has confirmed Japanese conceptual artist On Kawara has passed away.
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You can see On Kawara’s piece, Oct. 31, 1978 at Chicago’s Art Institute Museum.

hyperallergic:

(via Conceptual Artist On Kawara Dead at 81)

The David Zwirner gallery has confirmed Japanese conceptual artist On Kawara has passed away.

READ MORE

You can see On Kawara’s piece, Oct. 31, 1978 at Chicago’s Art Institute Museum.